Can you laugh in the face of death?

shallow focus photography of silver skeleton statue
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Laugh

Your challenge today, is to laugh if you think it’s funny.
In real life, automatically you react socially.  If something touches you as funny, at a funeral perhaps, you try and suppress a smile. Often this can be dismissed from your mind without you even realising.
Relax, no-one is watching – you can still laugh.
Nobody will think any worse of you.
I’ve been  thinking of my personal circumstances of the last few months,finding the humor in it.
The challenge,in a funny way, was to present something that would normally be funny but present it in a way that you couldn’t laugh.
Just so that we could both think of that social aspect of humor.
The aspect of being in an audience,ready to laugh, as you have been told the person who
is about to walk out is a comedian.

Death

Can you laugh in the face of death?
What has to happen to you to stop making a joke?
“Injury,illness and death.”  A man shouts out from the back.
“What about cancer?” I say. The man from the back nods his head.
That’s conclusive.
But what if it’s wrong?
What if you receive bad news and you can just joke around like you normally do?

Good news reigns.

I’ve been sitting on this good news for a few months, so don’t worry.
There is an old joke where they say “Do you want the good news or the bad news?”
You say “Bad news.”
The answer is “There is no good news.”

Good news Bad news

 

But there is  some good news.
The good news is I don’t have cancer.
The bad news is  – my wife does.
Good news – it has already spread ,you don’t have worry about it spreading.

Bad news  – it could spread further.

Good news –  it’s incurable and inoperable, stage 4 cancer.

Bad news – You got that one the wrong way round that’s the bad news.
 Good news    It can be fun to tell people you don’t like which chemo drugs she is on.
It’s Avastin and  5 F U  Yes.   
F U
You have to end some things with the good news, like an animal interest story on a slow
news day.

Airports

The first time you get fast tracked at airport security is amazing. You can see the massive
queue of everyone else going through security. You can really start to enjoy your travel.
The fast track to death is another matter.
We’re hoping the treatment will give my wife a downgrade.
My wife suggested I post something about this ,so I did.
She’s got cancer, so I can’t say no every time…
The next day she changed her mind and said “It’s up to you.”
I’d already written it by then.
Apart from this sentence,obviously.
And this one….

Chemo from home

 

The nurse came to our house for form filling and to take some blood tests.
My wife will also be getting chemotherapy at home – we’re at the start of this journey.
Imagine that. Not having to drive to the hospital.
It would have been Six trips every 16 days.
I thought it was the best thing that happened so far …
It just shows you. It doesn’t matter what happens to you
The worst thing is always the commute.

The Chemo Nurse

One of the first things the Nurse said was
“I love chemo,me.”
I thought, “Great, we’ve got doctor death.”
We didn’t we got Michelle .
Who was very nice.
Hopefully she says a few funny things in the future. It will save me writing them.

Mundanity

Sometimes it’s an indescribable sadness you don’t know how to express.
Sometimes it’s making doctors laugh as they prepare their practised faces to give you bad news.
Sometimes it’s selfishness – Fear of being alone, yet don’t we all have a ticket for the same
ride?
Most time it’s nothing,mundane. The same everyday as before.
Sometimes you realise how much you enjoy those little everyday things.
Amongst the sadness,somehow the sun shines brighter.
Although that could be the approaching summer 🙂


Tim Willow
What humor have you found in any illness or misfortune that you may have had?
A difficult question,perhaps.
This blog is supposed to be about nonsense and stupidity.
Don’t go spoiling it 🙂
Normal service will resume and I shall rest the topic unless something funny happens.

18 thoughts on “Can you laugh in the face of death?

  1. While I tend to laugh and find the humor in all things, cancer is a tough one. I tried to keep things light when my late mother was diagnosed with Non Hodgkins Lymphoma as it was already well advanced and nothing could be done. I pasted the smile on my face day after day when I was with her, made bedpan and hospital food jokes….. then broke down in private.
    If joking about it gets you and your wife through this…. then by all means, I’ll laugh with you. F U chemo is pretty hard not to chortle over.
    But if you need a place to let go of the harder emotions… know that I’m here for that too. Blogging my way through my mother’s illness was cathartic and definitely saved my sanity.
    (Don’t laugh, I still have a little left)

    Liked by 2 people

  2. We English are renowned for the stiff upper lip, and at my age I’m happy for a little stiff. To add to that I shall now pour myself a stiff drink to toast you both and wish you as many sunny days as you can handle. I think that FU is the best possible treatment for cancer!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I work for a funeral home. My job is to write funeral services & deliver them – like a pastor but not because I’m not religious but I’ll do a religious service if that’s what someone wants…or not. Humour is how we survive in this industry. Granted it’s pretty black humour at times, but humour nonetheless.
    I’m sorry for what you’re going through. Cancer sucks.
    Find the humour when and where you can, it will help. Laughter heals. So do tears. Use both and apologize for neither.

    Liked by 1 person

    • When I read this I first thought it was from my old post about a funeral home which had dark humor, thanks Cathy for a kind,considerate and knowledgeable comment. Fun is still fun but there are lots of sharp edges. Although (dark humor alert) perhaps you’re looking for business:) I will will cling close to your words,often to cry is the only way. But I clap my hands together and,after a while, we say that’s enough. Often we laugh at how much we’ve been crying 🙂 thanks for your comment.

      Liked by 1 person

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