Does it have to be a horse?

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A nod is as good as a wink to a blind horse.

Tom Cruise.   

Tom Cruise can make these statements but the rules aren’t really clear to me.

I don’t have a horse.

I’m a good nodder and winker but there are no horses where I live.

What is it you want me to do Tom?

Can I nod and wink to  people instead?

If a nod means yes to a man what does it mean to a horse?

If I wink to a man does he think of carrots?

What does a woman think of?

Is it a Scientology thing?

Your public demands an answer.

 

Tim Willow’s Additional Thoughts

I can’t guarantee he said this precise quote but I am certain he has said all the individual words.

I simply cut and pasted the words from different sentences he has used in his life to form the quote.

Therefore avoiding his fee per sentence.

I have heard that,when he is not filming,  his family sponsor Tom to say different things for candy.

Who doesn’t like candy?



 

I never got to Tom Cruise’s fee level, but I was of a similar mind.

Why say anything for free, when you can make it pay?

In fact,if you’re not making money, why say anything at all?

I should also add that nodding and winking to a blind horse is the same as having no horse at all.

After all that, Tom was really saying, I didn’t need a blind horse.

I could live my best life nodding and winking without one.



The ruins in the back of the photo are of Rievaulx Abbey

One of the abbeys that Henry VIII found and destroyed.

A good place to buy leather flagons for a slightly different tasting drink.

A good place to also think of the concentration of state power and the changes down to Henry VIII that still have an effect today.

Go with the flagons. They sell mead. You’re sorted.

Monk Jobs

I’m not sure if Monk jobs are still available.

Back in the day, all you had to do was hang about outside the monastery door for four days and nights.

Without food.

Next day they made you a monk.

How badly do you wan’t that job?

They should bring that back.

Origin of the phrase

The longer version of the phrase is ‘a nod is as good as a wink to a blind horse’. It might seem that this is just an elaboration of the shorter version, but it appears that the ‘blind horse’ version was in fact the original. The earliest examples of the proverb in print all give the fuller version, for example, in the Letters of the English lawyer and writer Joseph Ritson, February 1793:

A nod, you know, is as good as a wink to a blind horse.

It seems intuitive to interpret the longer version as meaning ‘neither a nod nor a wink has any purpose, both being equally pointless’. Nevertheless, the context of the early uses has it being used with the same apparent meaning as the short version, that is, ‘you may nod or wink – I will take your meaning either way’.

During the 19th century the expression began to be shortened and the blind horse was left at home. Citations from that period use the form ‘a nod is as good as a wink etc.’, which clearly indicates that the later usage was simply a shorthand way of writing the original.

24 thoughts on “Does it have to be a horse?

  1. I was about to Google Tom Cruise and that quote…I must remember not to take everything you say seriously.

    I also didn’t know there was a horse in the “nods as good as a wink” saying…but then I think I first heard it in a Monty Python sketch.

    That’s my education for the day. Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

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